10 Future of Higher Education Discussion Starters, Quotes, & Predictions


1. “The future looks like this: Access to college-level education will be free for everyone; the residential college campus will become largely obsolete; tens of thousands of professors will lose their jobs; the bachelor’s degree will become increasingly irrelevant; and ten years from now Harvard will enroll ten million students.” from Nathan Harden in The End of the University as We Know It.

2. “College is Dead. Long Live College!” from Amanda Ripley in Time article by that title.

3. “Higher education does have real problems, and MOOC’s, badges—certificates of accomplishment—and other innovations have real potential to tackle some of them. They could enrich teaching, add rigor, encourage interdisciplinarity, reinforce education’s real-world applicability, and make learning more efficient—advances all sorely needed.” from Scott Carlson & Goldie Blumenstyk in For Whom is College Being Reinvented?

4. “We have also learned that our university must be intimately engaged in primary and secondary education so that future students come to us with the necessary skills that will help them thrive in an academic environment.” from John Petillo (President of Sacred Heart University) in Assessing the Future of Higher Education.

5. “For decades, the growth of knowledge and development of culture and industry was heavily dependent upon what went on inside major research U.S. universities. Today, it is no longer clear that universities will continue to be the dominant site (or model) for the generation of new knowledge.” from Overview of The Future of Higher Education 12/11

6. Regarding MOOCs, “Disruptive because many in the higher ed community worry that unless they’re careful, universities will go the way of newspapers and the music industry: give their product away for free online and lose customers in the process.” from Ida Lieszkovsky in MOOCS and the Future of Technology in Higher Education

7. “As lecture content is moved online, instructors will be able to re-think the classroom experience.  A new model for peer-to-peer and peer-to-faculty interaction will need to be created, as this is one of the most fundamental components of classroom learning.” from Chris Proulx in 5 Ways Technology Will Impact Higher Ed in 2013

8. “On-campus tuition will continue to rise, to cover increasing costs for services and facilities. This, in turn, will further reduce enrollments, and campuses will become less diverse, accessible only to students from affluent families. Online education presents a huge opportunity to reverse these trends and improve the economic health of public colleges and universities.”  by Jeb Bush in Commentary: Online Courses Can Ed higher Education’s Financial Crisis

9. “The liberal arts education has outlasted other forms of pedagogical training. Indeed, one might go so far as to argue that the modern world is the by-product of minds trained in the liberal arts tradition.” from Dr. Tillman Nechtman in The Liberal Arts in the Modern World: A Defense

10. “We believe that universities and companies will begin to create and license online courses and use them in a smaller, contained/closed environment.  MOOCs won’t go away, but the real traction will be the use of teaching technologies brought down to smaller groups of people that will more closely mimic the best of the current classroom environment.”
by Dayna Catropa & Margaret Andrews in MOOCs to MOCCs.


2 comments

  1. David Black says:

    Interesting point #4. If this is true, this argues for a much stronger education system in Lutheran education , and much more pulling together would be needed.

    I had never really thought about #6. Does history repeat itself? What are the other options for higher ed.?

    Would be interesting to have a few more chime in on this blog to share what they are seeing.

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