27 Resources to Help Cultivate Design Thinking for Educators

I am passionate about teaching and mentoring students. I also love consulting and researching.  However, the one thing that consistently takes me into a state of flow is when the design thinking begins.  In some ways, it doesn’t matter if I am “designing” an idea, an essay, a lesson plan, a home office/library, a new program, a family vacation, a game, a business strategy, or a new research project.  It can be something abstract or concrete, tactile or theoretical.  I love to design things, so I have little to no neutrality when I make the following assertion.  As much as learning organizations today need great teaching, I am increasingly convinced that an important difference between good and great learning organizations has to do with the degree to which they engage in and are collectively informed by design thinking.  The great thing about this is that design thinking is wonderfully multidisciplinary, and I find that some of my most well-received learning experience designs (yes, the learning experience canvas is my primary medium as a designer) are inspired by novel and diverse resources and experiences.  With that in mind, here are twenty-seven books that help to inform my thinking about transformational learning spaces, places, and experiences.  Feel free to suggest other resources in the comment section

Posted in blog, design thinking, education, innovation, philosophy of education

About Bernard Bull

Dr. Bernard Bull is the author of Missional Moonshots, Assistant Vice President of Academics, Associate Professor of education, and a frequent keynote speaker and consultant on topics related to educational innovation and entrepreneurship, futures in education, and the intersection of education and digital culture. Opinions expressed here do not reflect those of his primary employer(s).

One thought on “27 Resources to Help Cultivate Design Thinking for Educators

  1. David Black

    Daniel Pink and A Whole New Mind first got me thinking about the importance of design, not necessarily from an educational perspective, although applications for that are possible.

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