5 Reasons for Blended Learning: Clarifying the Why

I’m leading a 4-week mini-MOOC on Adventures in Blended Learning from January 5 – 30 (by the way, all are welcome to participate in part or all of the experiences). While signing up is already already indication that those people have interest in understanding and maybe trying to intentionally design blended learning experiences, I am compelled to start with an exploration of the compelling “why” about blended learning. Without the why, too many things can go awry and a sense of relevance about “what” we are learning is more likely to die. As I explained in a recent article, integrating technology in and of itself is not an admirable or worthwhile goal. It is about designing learning experiences that best meet the needs of students. Toward that end, I offer 5 possible (but somewhat overlapping) reasons for considering the use of blended learning. This is far from an exhaustive list. There are many more, but these represent some of the most commonly referenced reasons.

1. To reap the promised benefits of research findings about blended learning.

There is a growing body of literature that now spans over a decade about blended learning. We are finding multiple benefits from taking the best of both worlds (face-to-face and online) in the classroom. As such, some are choosing blended learning so they can reap the benefits suggested in these research reports.

2. To create opportunities for one-on-on and small group time between the teacher and students.

In a traditional classroom environment, the teacher is often working with everyone at the same time. That leaves little time for high-impact personalized moments with each student or small groups of students? Think of the idea of stations that is common in early childhood education. Now imagine a situation where you do the same thing with older students, even high school and college. Every “station” contributes something new to the student’s learning about a stated learning objective. Some stations might be practice, others a chance to test their knowledge of key ideas through an interactive low-stakes assessment online, and yet other stations might be the teacher working with a small group of students. This is one of many possible blended learning models, but it allows teachers the flexibility to meet the needs of more students while giving everyone rich and valuable learning experiences.

This is also part of the reason that many are opting for a form of blended learning called the flipped classroom, where students learn about basic content outside of class but then come to class to do “homework”, freeing up the teacher to wander the room and work with individuals or small groups as needed.

3. To provide personalized learning.

We all know that students are not the same. They come to our classes with different knowledge, skills, abilities, passions, prior knowledge beliefs about what we will be teaching, levels of confidence, and all sorts of other things that impact how and what they learn in our classes. One strategy in the past was to try to find a level of teaching that reaches somewhere in the middle, allowing the teacher (sometimes with help) to do special work with the struggling students and/or enhancements for the student performing well. Or, in some contexts, the struggling and high performing students just have their needs unmet, sometimes walking away from the experience bored, disconnected, and with little progress. As we think about leveraging the best of face-to-face and online instruction together, it gives us new ways to think about providing multiple pathways to the same learning destination, pathways that work for individuals. Or, for some it is more about the pace. Some self-paced digital learning experiences allow each student to work at different paces, better meeting their individual needs. Personalization by time and pace are challenging in many traditional classroom designs, but new opportunities arise when we explore blended learning designs.

Many talk about this is terms of moving away from a one-size-fits all approach to education.

4. To take advantage of student data and adaptive learning.

As educational products and software develop, there are growing selections of what is called adaptive learning software. It is software that adapts and adjusts according to student performance, allowing a level of personalization and tracking of student progress that is difficult otherwise. By blending a class experience between teacher-guided instruction and computer-based instruction with such software, teachers are able to get rich data about student progress, and students get lessons catered their own level and readiness. Take a look at the image included in this article written for educational publishers and content providers (you might be interested in reading the article too). Notice the feedback loops that I represent in the visual. Designing classes that get at these sorts of models if part of what is leading schools and teachers to opt for a blended learning approach.

Many argue that this data will help us from letting some students “fall between the cracks.”

5. Extending the classroom and resources beyond the school walls.

The digital revolution leaves us with unprecedented access to rich content, communities, and people from around the world. Some are designing blended learning lessons and experiences to capitalize upon this access, building opportunities for individual students or groups to engage with this online content and people or communities to help them make progress in their learning. We see this with foreign language instruction as teachers build programs for students from different countries to interact with each other. We see it for student-centered projects and research. We see it with students collaborating with professionals or students from other schools using digital tools.

One example comes from the idea of helping students build what we call a student personal learning network, but there are hundreds of other ways to leverage this access as well.