10 Tips for Parents Who Crave More For their Childrens’ Education

Are you frustrated with the educational opportunities for your children? Do you find yourself wishing that there was something more, something better? Or, have you already taken things into your own hands, seeking out or creating an alternative to the standard schooling options? If any of these are true for you, please keep reading. I have 10 tips for parents who want more for their children’s education.

Are you a teacher who is not content with the educational opportunities available to many children today? Are you convinced that a one-size-fits-all approach risks becoming a one-size-fails-all approach? Do you love education and kids, but believe that there has to be a better way? Are you frustrated with the amount of boredom or bullying, testing and grading, ranking and rating, and the overall lack of time talking about how to nurture curiosity, character and a love of learning? Or, have you already taken things into you your own hands to create better alternatives to the dominant systems? If you answered yes to any of these questions, please keep reading. While my comments are mainly directed at parents, I think you might find value in them as well.

Some, maybe even most, parents are happy with the current education system. They drop their children off at school or send them off to the bus stop, and they have little concern about the school day. Generally, they trust the system, the teachers, the leaders, the curriculum and the community. They are happy with the quality of the education and what their kids are learning. It is not uncommon for them to argue that it was good enough for them and it is good enough for their kids. They know things will not be perfect, but they are good enough. They know there will be that occasional ill-prepared, unfair or unpleasant teacher whom their kid has to endure. They reason that this is okay. It just prepares the kid for the real world when she will need to work with sometimes unpleasant bosses and co-workers, or live by an unfriendly neighbor.

They realize that bullying and boredom can and will happen (more or less depending upon the school), but also see that as a chance to develop a thick skin. Or, the parent is just confident that their kid is not one of those bully-able children. That is for “those” other children. They hear their kids talk about school being boring sometimes. The parents are alright with that too because that is what the parents thought about school when they were kids. School is just boring sometimes. You suck it up and work your way through it one grade at a time. Besides, these parents also console themselves by noting that not every moment is boring. There are also engaging and wonderful teachers, lessons and learning experience; again more or less depending upon the school. Sometimes they even see their kid liking what they are learning and talking about how much they love school.

Along the way, these parents are happy that their kids will make school friends, participate in some valued extracurriculars, get decent grades, and then move on to the next level of school. They rarely question the grading system, the nature of the community, the curriculum, or whether they system could be better. It is what it is, and it is good enough for them.

Besides, school is also a community for the parents, sometimes building friendships with other parents. It is one of their connections with the community. It makes them feel like they belong to something, and belonging, even when it is not perfect or when it is unpleasant, can be an important factor.

Some of these parents are largely submissive to leadership in the schools. They grew up learning not to question teachers and school leaders, and they stick with that approach. They might not consider themselves qualified to question leadership or they just consider it best to leave these decisions to the “professionals.” They might have moments of doubt and frustration, but in the end, they will usually just go with the flow.

Other parents are actively trying to shape the school to meet their needs and the needs of their children. They might volunteer. They might use their refined skills of influence and social pressure on parents, teachers, leaders, and even board members. They speak up for their kids if the parents are unhappy with how things are playing out. As such, they might not love the system, but they get enough of what they want to be content. They do what they can to make sure their kid is taken care of or maybe even given a little advantage over others. They might even see it as a game, and they are going to help their kid win it.

All of this is typical, but it isn’t the only way. There is a different breed of parent that is breaking new ground, exploring lesser known (but increasingly traversed) pathways, and becoming more informed about the greater array of possibilities for their children’s education. They are sometimes bold, but other times a little (or more than a little) nervous about stepping out of the traditional and ready-made system.

nagging aching desire of parents These parents are not like the parents mentioned earlier in this article. Their concerns and needs are too great for them to just go along with the system because they are not content with it.These parents have a nagging, evening aching, desire for something different for their children, and it moves them to action. It makes no sense to them why we would overlook or downplay bullying as a necessarily social rite of passage. They don’t accept that boredom should be standard practice in school. They believe that learning should be engaging, rich, deep, rewarding, challenging, impactful and something that their children value and love. They believe that schools can be a place where each child is valued and helped to discover and develop his/her passions, lives, and abilities for personal well-being and service to others. They know political debates about national standards, standardized tests, integrating technology and the rest are not the pathway to better schools. They don’t want to settle for less. They want to know that their kids are safe, challenged, learning, growing, and helped to discover and nurture their gifits and abilities.

They also don’t accept that schools claim that they are ideologically neutral but then turn around and disregard or downplay their family’s values and convictions by supporting teachers and curricula that sometimes aggressively attack some of their deepest held convictions. They realize that their kids need to learn to live in a diverse world, respecting and relating with people from different backgrounds and perspectives, but then they are confused when the school seems to welcome certain types of diversity while labeling other types as unacceptable or even unethical. I”m not just referring to religious or ethical convictions. This is also about deeply held beliefs and convictions about education and children.

This blend of discontent and a dream of something better drives these parents to expand their search. Some are turning to homeschooling, although life circumstances or other factors make that challenging for certain families. Those who opt for homeschooling are finding that the variety of software, curricula, and community education opportunities are often so vast that they can quilt together an intellectually and socially rich learning experience. Others are looking to private and charter schools that have been bold enough to create a clear and focused vision to become a certain type of school. Even as people are rating these new charters based on narrow criteria like standardized test scores, they are looking for so much more out of a school experience then test-taking acumen, and these niche schools meet their needs and affirm their goals and values. Others are happy with a blend of homeschooling and alternative school options. Then there is also that small group of parents who venture into educational entrepreneurship, delving into a school or other learning community startup.

If you are one of these parents or teachers, or you are thinking about becoming one of them, I have the following words of encouragement and tips. While I’m writing these for the parents, teachers will find plenty of applicable insight in here as well.

You are not alone.

What you are thinking and feeling is not weird, undemocratic, or anti-social. You are in good and significant company. People around the United States and the world are thinking and feeling the same thing, and their courage to do something about it is driving some incredible new schools, new educational pathways, as well as some promising school reforms.

You are not a label.

Some will try to label anything that challenges the status quo as corporate education reform, neo-liberalism or some other category where they feel like they can easily label and then dismiss you. Don’t accept it. Just because they make up a category and put you in it doesn’t mean they really understand your position, how you came to that position, or your motives.

Your convictions matter.

I had a wise teacher once tell me that, “We learn too late that our convictions matter.” Don’t accept the rhetoric that you must suppress your convictions. For a little inspiration, take a moment to reread the 1st Amendment in the Constitution and consider whether the standard education system is deeply shaped and informed by that Amendment. Then consider whether the system is supporting and helping you to embrace and protect those personal rights by what they are doing. We can’t claim that public education is a democratic education unless we create an educational ecosystem that is truly shaped by the 1st Amendment, not to mention the others.

Find your tribe, but still mingle with and learn from other tribes.

The great part about life in a connected world is that you can find people who share your convictions and ideas from all over the world. You can support and inspire one another. You can collaborate with one another in pursuing your goals.

Stretch yourself. The other great part of life in a connected world is that you can also learn from people who are different from you. Explore the models and practices that don’t align with your beliefs and convictions as well. There is much to learn from the diverse practices and viewpoints. Some might even challenge you to reconsider some ideas. Others will help you clarify your convictions. Either way, this will deepen your understanding.

Get informed about the possibilities.

There are so many possibilities available to you and your children today. Take the time to learn about them. Read, interview, observe, and experience the wealth of options available.

Don’t accept the “good of the community” argument.

Every so often you will run into people claiming that you are self-absorbed anti-social if you are not signing up for the “assigned” public school for your area. People might tell you that it is somehow your civic duty to send your kids to that school, that this is something bigger than you and your children. I encourage you to challenge this idea. Yes, life is not all about you, but being a parent who is all in on supporting your children and their education is a civic duty. In fact, the family unit is an important part of positive communities. Muzzling your own rights and passively going along with someone else’s ideas about education is not a more noble or democratic path.

Respect but don’t accept the expert myth.

Yes, those working in education often bring great expertise and insight that individual parents do not. That is no argument for you to sit on the sidelines or submit to whatever they say. Even the medical field recognizes this. Doctors don’t order you. They advise and recommend. Those working in schools exist to serve and support you and the children, not to rule over you and the children. It is great to respect their expertise, listen and learn from them, but you still have the final say; and your ideas and convictions matter.

Go for it.

You might opt to stay in the legacy school system, homeschool, go the charter school route, or select a private school. You might even choose to create a new school. Along the way you might need to re-evaluate. All of that is good and okay. Don’t feel badly about it. It is great to find wise counsel amid the decision, but there is no one or perfect choice. Any of these options can be a good and positive experience. At the same time, don’t feel like you need to settle. I realize that circumstances and resources might limit your options for a spell, and that is reality. At the same time, even amid fewer resources, chances are that you have more options than you first realize. Explore the possibilities. Weigh the benefits and limitations. Seek wise counsel. Then go for it.

Respect the decisions of other families.

Sometimes, after doing all this work and thinking, it is easy to become a powerful voice and advocate for whatever you choose. Sometimes this can also turn into way to assure yourself that you made a good choice. My advice, however, is to beware of turning your choice into the choice, trying to convince everyone to do and choose exactly as you did. This is not a one-size-fits-all decision. The legacy school is a great option for some and not for others. Just as you examined your own convictions and ideals, leave room for others to do the same. This doesn’t mean that you can’t boldly advocate for what you truly believe to be good and right, but consider bringing a good measure of humility to such conversations. While I believe that there are certain ideas that are universally good (like keeping kids safe), there is still plenty of room for difference, and that difference might actually be part of what makes the overall educational ecosystem healthy.

Don’t be limited to what “is.”

Part of why are seeing so many wonderful experiments in education is because more people are willing to not stop at what already exists. They are willing to imagine what could be and they are working to make those things a reality. I invite you to at least consider whether you might be one of those pioneers, visionaries, or educational innovators to add more good and important option to the mix.

parents who crave more

25 Must-Read Books for the Educational Hacktivist or Contrarian

Maybe you love the way things are going in modern education. Perhaps you are desperately looking for an alternative. Or, you might already be deeply rooted in alternative education or educational entrepreneurship. No matter. The following reading list is sure to get you thinking, exploring the possibilities, and shaping your own educational philosophy.

This isn’t an exhaustive list, and it is far from neutral. What I’ve included below are some of my favorite texts that challenging some of the more conventional ways of thinking about learning and education. These are texts that challenge us to rethink schooling and learning. Some are written for educators; others for the students or parents; and still others for policy-makers, educational difference-makers, or just people who care about education. Some are detailed and refined. Some are rough around the edges, but their ideas are penetrating, thought-provoking, and downright challenging to many things that often go unquestioned in modern educational organizations. What these books have in common is an ability to getting us thinking more deeply about education, inviting us to challenge the status quo, and providing us different perspectives than what we find in may classrooms and educational institutions.

I don’t expect you to agree with everything in these books. I sure don’t. However, each of these authors, in their distinct ways, help us look at things differently, whether it is how schools should run, what constitutes good assessments, what it takes to grow as a competent and confident learner, the role of entrepreneurship in education, or the meaning and value of grades and diplomas. I guarantee that reading these books, even five of them, will give you a new view of modern schooling.

  1. Teaching as a Subversive Activity by Neil Postman
  2. What Does it Mean to be Well Educated? by Alphie Kohn
  3. Dr. Montessori’s Own Handbook: A short Guide to Her Ideas an Materials by Maria Montessori
  4. Rethinking Rubrics in Writing Assessment by Maja Wilson
  5. On Grades and Grading by Timothy Quinn
  6. De-testing, De-grading Schools: Authentic Alternatives to Accountability and Standardization edited by Joe Bower and P.L. Thomas
  7. Cool Colleges for the Hyper-Intelligent, Self-Directed, Late Blooming, and Just Plain Different by Donald Asher
  8. Social Entrepreneurship in Education: Private Ventures for the Public Good by Michael Sandler
  9. The Unschooling Handbook: How to Ue the Whole World As Your Child’s Classroom Mary Griffith
  10. The Teenage Liberation Handbook by Grace Llewellyn
  11. How to Succeed in School Without Really Learning: The Credentials Race in American Education by David Labaree
  12. Self-Directed Learning: A Guide for Learners and Teachers by Malcolm Knowles
  13. Someone Has to Fail: The Zero-Sum Game of Public Schooling by David Labaree
  14. Schools for Growth: Radical Alternatives to Current Educational Models by Lois Holzman
  15. The Game of School: Why We all Play it, How it Hurts Kids, and What it Will Take to Change It by Robert Fried
  16. Teacherpreneurs: Innovative Teachers Who Lead but Don’t Leave by Barnett Barry and Ann Byrd
  17. The Future of Educational Entrepreneurship by Frederick Hess
  18. Starting a Sudbury School: A Summary of the Experiences of Fifteen Start-up Groups by Daniel Greenberg and Mimsy Sadofsky
  19. Getting it Wrong from the Beginning: Our Progressivist Inheritance from Herbert Spencer, John Dewey and Jean Piaget by Kieran Egan
  20. Informal Learning by Jay Cross
  21. Hacking Your Education by Dale Stephens
  22. The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  23. One Size Does Not Fit All by Nikhil Goyal
  24. Mind Amplifiers: Can Our Digital Tools Make Us Smarter by Howard Rheingold
  25. The Underground History of American Education by John Taylor Gatto

College is Not Enough & The University Doesn’t Own the Liberal Arts #collegeand

Dale Stephens, author of Hacking Your Education and founder of Uncollege, takes the vision of unschooling and applies it to higher education.  He points out that learning and getting an education is much more than attending classes at a University.  For many high school students, they are given a few options.  You can go college, join the military, or get a job.  Stephens helps young people discover a fourth option, one that embraces a commitment to learning that is just as rigorous as many college experiences, but that also allows them to pursue entrepreneurial opportunities at the same time.  He challenges the idea that college is the only choice that leads to success, but he also challenges the idea that college is the only path that leads to deep, substantive, transformational learning.  Like many who embrace the spirit of unschooling, Stephens shares a compelling case for a life of learning beyond school.  We learn through play, building new and meaningful relationships, experimentation, exploration, work, reading, travel, community engagement, finding others to mentor us, leveraging the vast pool of resources in the digital world, and participating in a variety of communities and groups with shared interests.

One does not need to abandon the pursuit of a college education to learn from this message.  I’m a University administrator, professor, and a lifelong student (with a bachelor’s degree, two master’s degrees, a doctorate, and coursework at 20+ Universities), and I have no problem endorsing Stephens’s message.  Many University faculty and administrators promote the value of a solid liberal arts college education, noting that it equips people with the capacity the think well, live well, write well, and communicate well.  And yet, it is in some of those liberal arts classes that students learn about George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Harry Truman, Andrew Jackson, Grover Cleveland, Frank Lloyd Wright, William Faulkner, Ansel Adams, Jack London, William Blake, Robert Frost, Thomas Edison, and Henry Ford.  They never earned a college degree.  We can extend that list by hundreds with highly successful people in multiple industries and parts of the world today. We can add thousands more by touring the history books.  One may respond by arguing that these are exceptional people, that they are exceptions and not the rule. My point is not that avoiding college will make a person successful.  It is that the proposed outcomes of a solid liberal arts education are possible beyond the walls of the University.  I know many who attended liberal arts colleges and left with little respect for the great books, little interest in reading something that isn’t required for a class or job, and a fear of public speaking.  I know others who never attended college and they have an unquenchable thirst for knowledge, a love of the classics, and they live as a contemporary renaissance man or woman.  Steve jobs never finished college, but in a 1995 interview, he specifically noted that the vision and innovation behind Apple comes partly from their commitment to the liberal arts.  The University does not own the liberal arts.

Despite all of this, a solid college education is a good and valuable investment.  It is a learning community that is rich with opportunities, but not if you are simply talking about taking a series of classes and earning a bachelor’s degree. That will not adequately prepare someone for life beyond college. I do not recommend that students allow their college years to be dominated by some sort of cloistered college experience. “College and…” is my suggestion.  There is value in college and…travel, road trips, work, community engagement, entrepreneurial efforts, personal exploration and experimentation beyond the classroom walls and the campus boundaries, using the digital world to build a broad and substantive personal learning network, and participating in diverse groups and communities beyond the college. Many colleges recognize the importance of this as they offer more travel study options, are deeply engaged with community activities and social causes, give students opportunities to work on cutting edge research and innovation, provide resources to help students with internships, provide entrepreneurial centers to help students start their own businesses, emphasize things like service learning, and help pair students with mentors beyond the University. Going to college and not exploring these learning experiences leaves one with an incomplete education.  The true spirit of the liberal arts cannot be contained within a classroom or school.  It is about cultivating refinement, but is even more about liberation, exploration and transformation that extends for a lifetime and well beyond the school walls.

While I appreciate many things from the unschooling movement, the reality is that certain vocational paths will continue to require a college education.  For those aspiring to be doctors, lawyers, and P-20 teachers; for example, skipping college isn’t typically an option.   However, if one wants to be ready for life beyond college, then it requires getting deeply involved with life beyond college…it requires “college and…”